Elizabethan Era 1558 - 1603

The Tudors Era 1485 - 1603

Jacobean Era 1603 - 1625

Henry Morgan Famous Pirate: part 1



Henry Morgan was born in 1635 as the eldest son to Robert Morgan who was a squire of Llanrumney in the Welsh country of Monmouthshire. There is very little information known about him before he started his pirating career. Also, not much is known about how he managed to reach Jamaica.

Henry Morgan during the peak years of his career was a privateer for the English Crown to fight the Spanish troops. In 1663, he was made the Knight of Realm by King Charles II and was also the captain of a privateer ship. In 1665, Henry married his cousin Mary and they died issueless.

In 1661, Morgan was made the captain of Chirstopher Mings first ship and Henry had been successful in looting the Mexican coast. Sir Thomas Modyford was a person who played a crucial role in the granting sanctions to Morgan to carry on his activities despite repeated warnings from the Crown as England had temporarily made peaceful settlements with Spain.

In 1667, he was sent by Modyford to capture a few Spanish prisoners in Cuba to extract the details of the Jamaican attack. Morgan along with ten ships and around 500 men captured Puerto Principe. After this success, Morgan was given another task against Spain.

Morgan and his crew were short of money to pay the debt they had incurred in Jamaica. In order to raise money, Morgan decided to attack Porto Bello, a Spanish trade centre in America consisting of warehouses filled with goods and valuables of the rich merchants. Since this place was filled with valuables and goods, it was protected from the enemies by three Spanish forts.

Morgan along with his ships and crew sailed through the seas and reached on the Northern coast of South America. On reaching closer to the forts, the crew members were petrified of the forts. After an encouraging speech by Morgan, the crew was ready to fight. They easily managed to capture two forts and destroy one of them. Read more about Henry Morgan.

   
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