Elizabethan Era 1558 - 1603

The Tudors Era 1485 - 1603

Jacobean Era 1603 - 1625

Voyages of Vasco da Gama



Vasco da Gama, the famous explorer, was born in the city of Sines, in Portugal, in the year 1469. He got the opportunity to be educated as a nobleman and served in the court of King Joao II because he was the son of the town's governor. He was also employed in the court of King Joao where he served as a nobleman. In the year 1492, he also worked as a naval officer, and commanded defense of Portuguese colonies from the French on the coast of Guinea. He was then handed over the mission to take control of the very first Portuguese voyage around Africa, to India.

Vasco da Gama had lengthened the sea route discovery of his precursor, Bartolomeu Dias, who had first rounded Africa's Cape of Good Hope in the year 1488. He culminated a generation of Portuguese sea discoveries, promoted by the nautical school of Henry the Navigator. Vasco da Gama was known to be the first European who sailed from Europe to Asia. He did what most other voyagers attempted and failed to achieve. His achievements led to a water route to Asia. This is what Vasco da Gama is most famous for.

First Voyage of Vasco da Gama

Vasco da Gama was renowned for leading an expedition which opened the sea route from Europe via the Cape of Good Hope to India. His accomplishment of the first all water trade that linked Europe and India was victorious. Da Gama's father, Estavao, was actually the King's first choice to make the expedition, but then he died before he was able to complete the task.

The King's next choice was, da Gama's brother, Paulo, who had refused to grab the opportunity. The King was keen on having the trip made, so he approached Vasco da Gama to make the trip and he completed the mission.

Second voyage of Vasco da Gama

Vasco da Gama was considered a hero after he arrived in Lisbon. In an effort to protect the trade path with India and usurp Muslim traders, Portugal dispatch another team of vessels headed by Pedro Ivares Cabral. The troop arrived at India in just under six months, and the expedition comprised a fire-fight with Muslim merchants, where Cabral's crew killed 600 men on Muslim cargo vessels. More importantly, for his home country, Cabral established the first Portuguese trading post in India.

In the year 1502, Vasco da Gama, arranged another journey to India which needed around twenty ships. Of that, ten of the ships were under his control, along with his uncle and newphew commanding the others. In the wake of Cabral's accomplishment and his many encounter, the King charged da Gama to further secure Portugal's dominance in the region.

   
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