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Bloody Mary Queen of Scots Facts



Mary Queen of Scots, Bloody Mary and Mary Tudor are one and the same; an intelligent yet ruthless woman who enjoyed exploiting her royal power.

Who Was Mary Tudor?

Mary Tudor was the daughter of Scotland's King James V and his French wife Mary de Guise. Shortly after her birth in 1542 the king died, and Mary, at only six days old became queen. At the age of five she was officially betrothed to Edward, the son of Henry VIII, though this agreement was broken by Mary's Catholic guardians as Edward, being Henry's son was of the Protestant faith. She was instead betrothed of the four year old Francis, heir to the crown of France.

They were eventually married in 1559. It was a short marriage as Francis died as a result of an ear infection less than a year later, leaving Mary a widow at only eighteen years of age. She returned to Scotland soon after.

How did she get the title of Bloody Mary Queen of Scots?

She acquired the title of Bloody Mary through a series of murderous events, especially the murder of her second husband the Earl of Darnley. Darnley was behind the death of the queen's Italian secretary David Rizzio. While dining with the queen and five other people he was dragged from the table by Darnley and his associates and stabbed fifty six times, the queen who was heavily pregnant at the time with the future king could do nothing.

Darnley was found dead outside of a house he had been staying in following an explosion, however the fact that the body was outside suggests that he was not killed in the blast but murdered. Mary then married the Earl of Bothwell, another of the men that were involved in the murder of her secretary which greatly upset the Scottish nobles.

Bloody Mary Facts

Bloody Mary Tudor was the cousin of Elizabeth I, despite being Scotland's queen she also had a valid claim on the English throne. Following her marriage to the Earl of Bothwell Mary was exiled from Scotland as the Scottish nobility raised arms against her. They forced her to abdicate the throne in 1567, leaving her to flee to England and seek help from her royal cousin. She gained her reputation as a ruthless plotter and schemer by trying to depose Elizabeth from her throne and take it, and England for herself.

Mary Tudor's Death

Despite being unwilling to believe that her cousin was trying to steal her throne, Elizabeth was forced to have her imprisoned when she arrived in England. She was kept under heavy surveillance in order that the throne is kept safe. She was imprisoned for nineteen years before Elizabeth was presented with concrete evidence that Mary was indeed plotting against her, as letters to Anthony Babington who was known to plot against the queen were intercepted by Francis Walsingham, Elizabeth's spy master. Mary was sent to trial in 1586 and was executed on February 8th 1587 at Fotheringhay Castle.

Bloody Mary Myth

The Bloody Mary legend origin lies in folklore. It is claimed that by staring into a mirror in a dimly lit or candle lit room, and repeating "Bloody Mary" at least three times will cause the apparition to appear. The Bloody Mary person that appears in the mirror is often claimed to be covered in blood and screaming curses at the person that invoked them.


   
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